Tired of Winter? Try Some Nettles

Stinging Nettle Soup

2 large handfuls of nettles, washed
1 large onion, sliced
4 potatoes, peeled and cut into smaller pieces
leftover vegetable broth
coconut milk or half and half cream (optional)

Put all the ingredients in a pan and bring to a slow boil.
Cook until the onions and the potatoes are soft. Use your handblender to puree the food.
Add some Himalayan salt and some pepper (to taste).
Pour in some of the coconut milk/cream to taste (optional) and enjoy your soup.

Nettles are high in vitamin K, manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron and fiber.

Nettles are also said to be beneficial as a diuretic and joint pain treatment. They may help promote healthy adrenal glands and kidneys, encouraging your body to get rid of toxins and react to stress in positive ways. Season allergies may be effected by them. Many people use stinging nettle to make tea, taking it for a variety of maladies, including respiratory and urinary problems, diabetes and protection against kidney stones, as well as to speed wound healing. No scientific evidence confirms these uses, however.

However they taste great, can be used in stead of spinach as a vegetable, in a frittata, in a stir fry, as a tea. I have frozen them and they used them in my green smoothies.

Just take a pair of gloves, a pair of scissors and a plastic bag and visit your favorite nettle patch or go to the store and buy a bag. This is the time to eat them as this is one of the first fresh greens available to us.

Don’t be scared, just do it. Your body will thank you for it

Do you need any more reasons and recipes to start incorporating them into your diet? Try the following recipes as well

http://pro-activenutrition.ca/recipes/stinging-nettle-frittata/

http://pro-activenutrition.ca/recipes/early-spring-soup-with-nettles/

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